Alternatives to sulfur dioxide for controlling Brettanomyces spoilage in wine

Background

Brettanomyces is a yeast associated with wine spoilage, particularly during storage.  Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is the most commonly approach used to control this yeast (Harris et al 2010). However, the use of SO2 has several downsides, including the potential to develop resistance (Curtin et al 2012).

Objectives/aims

Novel approaches to avoid SO2 in managing Brettanomyces such as biological agents including peptides (yeast killer factors) and/or enzymes (β-glucanase) and physical method of control (low voltage, high pressure, UV treatment) will be investigated. The development of rapid/real-time sensors for Brettanomyces might also contribute to management of this spoilage organism. This project would take advantage of current joint research between the AWRI and UoA on this topic.

Project leader


Associate Professor
Paul Grbin
University of Adelaide
 

Other investigators


Dr
Anthony Borneman
AWRI

Dr
Jean Macintyre
Pernod Ricard Winemakers
 

Students


Miss
Yanina Giordano
(PhD Student)
University of Adelaide
 

Industry partners

AGRFThe Australian Wine Research InstitutePernod Ricard Winemakers

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