Vascular transport into the berry impact on fruit size and composition

Background

Micro CT image of a berry and seeds. This image was acquired in a collaboration with the Nanoscale Organisation and Dynamics Group, Western Sydney University

Fruits, roots and leaves are interconnected by a dynamic vascular system allowing mass transport of essential materials and a means for whole plant communication and integration. Long distance transport via the grapevine’s xylem/phloem network ultimately defines fruit size and composition, impacting yield and wine style.

Objectives/aims

This project will define the mechanisms driving xylem/phloem flow and show how their close connection dictates water, carbohydrate, ion and signal flow to the berry. Metabolomics, transcriptomics and imaging will define the impacts of limitations in vascular transport processes in relation to berry growth, ripening and senescence.

Grape vasculature system

Outputs will help growers improve the quality of grapes and the resulting wines, thereby boosting profitability.

Project leader


Dr
Suzy Rogiers
NSW DPI
 

Research Associates


Dr
Zeyu Xiao
(Research Associate)
Charles Sturt University
 

Other investigators


Professor
Leigh Schmidtke
Charles Sturt University

Professor
Stephen Tyerman
University of Adelaide

Dr
Vinay Pagay
University of Adelaide
 

Industry partners

AGRFNSW Department of Primary Industries

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